Skip to the content

The Rainbow’s End

East Idaho Outdoors

Keeping fish isn’t popular in the era of catch and release fishing, but introduced rainbow trout are outnumbering native Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the West. In an aggressive move, biologists are removing rainbows to keep cutts in Idaho’s South Fork of the Snake River.

Read the Full Story


Cripple Creek

Gray’s Sporting Journal

Cattle country is getting a facelift for the sake of a bird, but don’t tell the cows. They’re not fond of sagebrush, the plant declining sage grouse populations need to survive. Both bird and cow need what Curlew National Grassland offers.

Read the Full Story


Alarm Sounds for Monarchs

USA Today

The Western population of monarch butterflies collapsed in 2018. Less than 30,000 insects wintered on the West Coast. National Parks with patches of milkweed may be the key to the butterfly’s recovery.

Read the Full Story


Golden Hour

East Idaho Outdoors

Fall is the time to drive, or float, the South Fork of the Snake River. It’s the season of shimmer revealed for locals, the people who don’t migrate. The ones who know the wet ribbon hydrates the desert life bordering its banks.

Read the Full Story


Seed Collectors

Cool Green Science

We’ve lost 20 days. Four decades of research prove wildflowers are blooming 20 days earlier than they used to. Now what?

Read the Full Story


Wild Warning

Post Register

Deep in the non-motorized wilds of Yellowstone National Park, anglers figure out how to safely fish bear country by packing llamas along as guards.

Read the Full Story